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Causing a Disturbance During the World Cup

World Cup Soccer has hit television screens across the country.  The highly anticipated event causes adrenaline rushes in fans across the globe. Soccer fans should remember that the way they choose to express their jubilation at winning and upset at losing can have criminal law implications. During the World Cup it is common to see people hanging off of cars, waving flags, honking horns, dancing in the streets in an intoxicated state, and, generally, creating a lot of noise. Sometimes the dynamic of a crowd can cause people to forget that the criminal law still applies no matter how many individuals choose the same form of expression. The reality is that some of the gregarious World Cup behavior can attract criminal charges. According to the Canadian Criminal Code, causing a disturbance is a criminal offence. Section 175(1)(a) provides: 175. (1) Everyone who, not being in a dwelling-house, causes a disturbance…

23 Jun 2010

Diversion in Criminal Cases

30 May 2010

A criminal record can have a serious impact on your future. The effects of a criminal record can include restrictions on your travel ability and future employment. If you are…

Police Powers and Investigative Detention

28 May 2010

The police may approach you for questioning in a variety of situations. You may be walking down the street, hanging out at school or even driving in your car. It…

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms...

25 May 2010

There are two essential stages to any challenge under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In the first stage, the claimant, working with his or her criminal defence lawyer,…

Section 1 of the Canadian Charter of Rights...

20 Apr 2010

There are two essential stages to any challenge under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. In the first stage, the claimant, working with his or her criminal defence lawyer,…

Section 11 of the Canadian Charter of Rights...

9 Apr 2010

Section 11 of the Charter guarantees every individual certain rights when they are charged with a criminal offence. Section 11 applies to all types of offences (criminal, quasi-criminal, and regulatory…

Long Term Offender Designation

13 Mar 2010

Bill C-55, which came into force on August 1st, 1997, made significant changes to Canada’s Dangerous Offender legislation. This legislation allows the government of Canada to detain indefinitely those offenders…