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#wrongfullyconvictedwednesdays

Driskell spent 12 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit. In 1991 Canadian James Patrick Driskell, was wrongfully convicted for the first-degree murder of his friend Perry Harder. Driskell was running a “chop shop” with Harder, where they allegedly cut apart stolen vehicles and sold the parts. In November 1989, police learned about the chop shop, searched it, and arrested both Driskell and Harder. They were both charged with various criminal offences, including possession of stolen property. Harder decided to take a plea deal that the prosecution had offered him. He planned to plead guilty to some of his charges, in exchange for a relatively short prison sentence of two to three years. On June 21, 1990, Harder failed to attend court to enter his guilty pleas as agreed. The police were unable to locate him, and eventually the charges against James were dropped. Three months later Harder’s body…

18 May 2016

Is it a Crime to fake your own death in...

17 May 2016

Psuedocide is legal in Canada.  It is not a crime to fake your own death is in Canada.  What is psuedocide? Psuedocide refers to the phenomenon of someone faking his…

What is Sexual Consent?

12 May 2016

without clear consent sexual activity is sexual assault. Sexual consent is sexual behaviour that both parties consent to. While this may seem like an unequivocally  clear…

#wrongfullyconvictedwednesdays

11 May 2016

Steven Truscott was sentenced to be hanged at only 14 yrs old. Canadian teenager, Steven Truscott was wrongfully convicted of the rape and murder of his…

Is it Crime to Burn the Canadian Flag?

10 May 2016

  It is legal to burn the Canadian flag. It is legal to burn the Canadian Flag, in Canada. The Canadian flag may be a symbol…

What is the Difference Between Criminal...

6 May 2016

What are Criminal Offences?   Different offences carry different consequences In the Canadian legal system, there are offences legislated under the Criminal Code of Canada and…

Is It a Crime to Abandon Your Dog?

3 May 2016

Abandoning your dog can be a criminal act.         Abandoning your dog is explicitly defined as a crime in the Criminal Code of Canada Section 446(1)(b).  S.446(1)(b)…